/page/2

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET ELEVEN+TWELVE. CAR+PARK

As the above preoccupations all dealt with a particular quality or material aspect of a building, I felt it important to put it into practice. It was my intent at the start of the cards to create a mock design project almost, as the vehicle for testing these things. As it has been alluded to above, the ways in which space is considered or the ways in which something considered to be open could be inserted into something typically considered to be closed has been of interest to me. All of these ideas started with the overarching idea of experience. I took this to be the way I and the broader community experience Perth. Ultimately this lead me to the discovery and understanding of the reliance placed on personal modes of transport and the priority give to open space. It was my opinion that the area these two occupations take away from the urban fabric, negatively contributed to the experience of Perth. How could these two aspects be combined, streamlined if you will, to be more efficient and to positively contribute to the experiences of Perth. The solution was the idea of the car+park. This was the ‘vehicle’ and a way of considering space, light, material, texture, etc. to not only better understand my own interests but the way that they could be used to contribute better architecture and better experience to the city which I live.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET TEN. TEXTURE
Just as is the case for material, texture plays an important role in the experience of a building. For instance, an old brick wall may evoke feelings of nostalgia in the user. The texture of this might suggest timelessness and history and encourages the user to consider the space for something other, something deeper than just function. The way the texture presents itself to the occupant might encourage them to engage with the space or, conversely, pass by quickly
This has some reliance on the way it holds the light. For instance, to use the same example of brick, a glazed brick, which presents itself almost like a tile holds and reflects the light differently to an exposed, old brick wall.
I think its important to consider all of these cases in context. By selecting a texture, you must consider what role it will have within the building and what the experience of this will be. By combining a number of differently textured, yet uniform materials in a building, moments can be created about these points of difference. If you were to use a single material with a single material finish it becomes mundane and uniform, but by breaking it up with subtle differences in texture and finish the way these spaces and points of difference are experienced become heightened.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET TEN. TEXTURE

Just as is the case for material, texture plays an important role in the experience of a building. For instance, an old brick wall may evoke feelings of nostalgia in the user. The texture of this might suggest timelessness and history and encourages the user to consider the space for something other, something deeper than just function. The way the texture presents itself to the occupant might encourage them to engage with the space or, conversely, pass by quickly

This has some reliance on the way it holds the light. For instance, to use the same example of brick, a glazed brick, which presents itself almost like a tile holds and reflects the light differently to an exposed, old brick wall.

I think its important to consider all of these cases in context. By selecting a texture, you must consider what role it will have within the building and what the experience of this will be. By combining a number of differently textured, yet uniform materials in a building, moments can be created about these points of difference. If you were to use a single material with a single material finish it becomes mundane and uniform, but by breaking it up with subtle differences in texture and finish the way these spaces and points of difference are experienced become heightened.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET NINE. MATERIAL.
Forgetting the vast range of materials for just one moment. Think about the vast ways in which a specific material may be handled. Each of these gives a different outcome. For instance brick can be treated in a number of different manners, all of which produce a different way of experiencing the product. Add to that the various different finishes available when selecting brick and the outcomes become infinite. What quality do you want to achieve? What material is the best to help achieve this? How will it be treated?
Materials react to each other. That is, one material looks different and creates a different sense of space when coupled with different materials. How can a material quality be enriched by another material?
The reactions between materials may happen for a number of different reasons and the reasons why must be considered when designing. For instance, are the materials in contrast because of the perceived properties, something delicate like a piece of fabric coupled with a massive and rough rammed earth wall. It is these reactions, the subtleties that heighten the experience. Is the reaction the one you desired? Is it reacting for the right reasons or is it merely just a coincidence that these work well together. When materials complement each other, due to more than just aesthetics and the reactions happen as a result of the properties, colours, presence etc. that’s when real intrigue, interest and appreciation starts to take place.
Materials react with each other based on all of the above circumstances. They must be considered with regard to proximity also. If materials are too close they may start to overpower each other and create an adverse experience. Just as if they are too far apart, the contrast may not be evident and the outcome will become lost.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET NINE. MATERIAL.

Forgetting the vast range of materials for just one moment. Think about the vast ways in which a specific material may be handled. Each of these gives a different outcome. For instance brick can be treated in a number of different manners, all of which produce a different way of experiencing the product. Add to that the various different finishes available when selecting brick and the outcomes become infinite. What quality do you want to achieve? What material is the best to help achieve this? How will it be treated?

Materials react to each other. That is, one material looks different and creates a different sense of space when coupled with different materials. How can a material quality be enriched by another material?

The reactions between materials may happen for a number of different reasons and the reasons why must be considered when designing. For instance, are the materials in contrast because of the perceived properties, something delicate like a piece of fabric coupled with a massive and rough rammed earth wall. It is these reactions, the subtleties that heighten the experience. Is the reaction the one you desired? Is it reacting for the right reasons or is it merely just a coincidence that these work well together. When materials complement each other, due to more than just aesthetics and the reactions happen as a result of the properties, colours, presence etc. that’s when real intrigue, interest and appreciation starts to take place.

Materials react with each other based on all of the above circumstances. They must be considered with regard to proximity also. If materials are too close they may start to overpower each other and create an adverse experience. Just as if they are too far apart, the contrast may not be evident and the outcome will become lost.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET EIGHT. LIGHT.
The way in which light can be manipulated leads to vastly different, highly experiential architecture. It should be apparent that all of these personal preoccupations can start to be linked to each other both directly and indirectly. Light, plays a big role in the idea of narrative, for me. Particullary in the way a space can be experienced, but then the ways it can suggest something beyond and act as a way to propose movement to something beyond. Light can be used to frame a space, to give it prescence and emphasis.
Just as light can encourage movement and be suggestive it can be manipulated to do the opposite. Light might be used to act as a barrier or to disguise a particular component or object. The way light is controlled and directed can give credibility to the definition of space. For instance the way light is controlled may suggest a division within an open room, this is a division of space which is transient and easily malleable dependent upon the desired experience to be created.
There is no denying that light plays an important role in the experiences I try to create within my work. The way a room is lit has a massive impact on the way it is experienced. Again, this should be considered with the purpose of the space in mind. If a room is dark, it will be experienced and used in a different way if it was highly luminous. Similarly, natural light has a different effect to artificial lighting. All of these things should be considered when designing spaces. Is there a particular feeling or effect that you are trying to recreate? How does the light fall in that experience? Is it even possible to recreate that in this space?
As was suggested before, light can suggest or provoke movement within, through or into another space. In the same way it can draw your attention to a particular aspect or area within a space. Just as light draws you to a space, its secondary properties should also be considered. Are people being drawn to that pool of light for the light or is it because it is in the middle of winter and the light is in fact seen as a source of warmth and comfort?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET EIGHT. LIGHT.

The way in which light can be manipulated leads to vastly different, highly experiential architecture. It should be apparent that all of these personal preoccupations can start to be linked to each other both directly and indirectly. Light, plays a big role in the idea of narrative, for me. Particullary in the way a space can be experienced, but then the ways it can suggest something beyond and act as a way to propose movement to something beyond. Light can be used to frame a space, to give it prescence and emphasis.

Just as light can encourage movement and be suggestive it can be manipulated to do the opposite. Light might be used to act as a barrier or to disguise a particular component or object. The way light is controlled and directed can give credibility to the definition of space. For instance the way light is controlled may suggest a division within an open room, this is a division of space which is transient and easily malleable dependent upon the desired experience to be created.

There is no denying that light plays an important role in the experiences I try to create within my work. The way a room is lit has a massive impact on the way it is experienced. Again, this should be considered with the purpose of the space in mind. If a room is dark, it will be experienced and used in a different way if it was highly luminous. Similarly, natural light has a different effect to artificial lighting. All of these things should be considered when designing spaces. Is there a particular feeling or effect that you are trying to recreate? How does the light fall in that experience? Is it even possible to recreate that in this space?

As was suggested before, light can suggest or provoke movement within, through or into another space. In the same way it can draw your attention to a particular aspect or area within a space. Just as light draws you to a space, its secondary properties should also be considered. Are people being drawn to that pool of light for the light or is it because it is in the middle of winter and the light is in fact seen as a source of warmth and comfort?

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET SEVEN. SPACE.
Space and what constitutes it is of great interest to me. I think it’s fascinating how personal perception essentially defines space. What one may consider to be space, may be considered by another not to be. For me, I don’t think there is such a thing as non-space. I think that there can be negative or less defined space, but all in all, everything should be considered.
That means that space may be defined by physical boundaries. Walls, flooring, roofing etc all in my mind constitute a tangible boundary or edge. Ultimately this boundary or edge is what constitutes or defines one space from another. Again though, this starts to link in with the previous set of cards and the idea of threshold. At what point does something cease to exist as it was originally defined? How far can something be broken down and removed until meaning is changed?
This leads on from the last point, how is space defined when not physically bounded? For me, as the diagrams suggest, this may be negative space or space which is constituted by moveable or less rigid means. This might include something like furniture or people.
Can a space be considered fixed or defined, but then be further separated or broken down into smaller, less physically bounded, but still highly defined spaces. The idea that a park, an unbounded space, be inserted into a physically defined space such as a building.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET SEVEN. SPACE.

Space and what constitutes it is of great interest to me. I think it’s fascinating how personal perception essentially defines space. What one may consider to be space, may be considered by another not to be. For me, I don’t think there is such a thing as non-space. I think that there can be negative or less defined space, but all in all, everything should be considered.

That means that space may be defined by physical boundaries. Walls, flooring, roofing etc all in my mind constitute a tangible boundary or edge. Ultimately this boundary or edge is what constitutes or defines one space from another. Again though, this starts to link in with the previous set of cards and the idea of threshold. At what point does something cease to exist as it was originally defined? How far can something be broken down and removed until meaning is changed?

This leads on from the last point, how is space defined when not physically bounded? For me, as the diagrams suggest, this may be negative space or space which is constituted by moveable or less rigid means. This might include something like furniture or people.

Can a space be considered fixed or defined, but then be further separated or broken down into smaller, less physically bounded, but still highly defined spaces. The idea that a park, an unbounded space, be inserted into a physically defined space such as a building.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET FIVE. SCALE
I think it’s important that commercial realities are realised and that practicing architecture does not mean design units or competition architecture. Therefore it is important that architecture first and foremost, is for the client. The proposal is what they asked for or require, second to that the architecture becomes yours. This is an idea which is realistically probably easier said than done, however, I think it is important to work to the constraints of commercial realities while still recognising and being able to make the architecture ‘yours’. This seems to be an idea which is prominent in a lot of the lectures we have had so far.
Conversely there is the park scale. These are large areas of open expansive space with little to no commercial value. To me, it is interesting to see how, and indeed if, these two polar opposites could combine to create a rich experience. To take a park, typically public, and turn it commercial seems to have lost the intent for me. How could a park be considered within a commercial operation and the ways in which the qualities of open space could be applied to a commercial product seems to be a more important and challenging question.
Human scale is important in all aspects of architecture. The way a building relates to and caters for human proportions is incredibly important in the outcome and experience offered. For a space to be expansive does not mean that it has to be physically open and expansive. I am more interested in the way the qualities of these spaces can be replicated to give similar experiences in more nonconventional settings or environments.
Again, the way a non-commercial space such as a park can be injected into a commercial program interests me. Could it be done? What would it be like? Would it be accepted and used by the community?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET FIVE. SCALE

I think it’s important that commercial realities are realised and that practicing architecture does not mean design units or competition architecture. Therefore it is important that architecture first and foremost, is for the client. The proposal is what they asked for or require, second to that the architecture becomes yours. This is an idea which is realistically probably easier said than done, however, I think it is important to work to the constraints of commercial realities while still recognising and being able to make the architecture ‘yours’. This seems to be an idea which is prominent in a lot of the lectures we have had so far.

Conversely there is the park scale. These are large areas of open expansive space with little to no commercial value. To me, it is interesting to see how, and indeed if, these two polar opposites could combine to create a rich experience. To take a park, typically public, and turn it commercial seems to have lost the intent for me. How could a park be considered within a commercial operation and the ways in which the qualities of open space could be applied to a commercial product seems to be a more important and challenging question.

Human scale is important in all aspects of architecture. The way a building relates to and caters for human proportions is incredibly important in the outcome and experience offered. For a space to be expansive does not mean that it has to be physically open and expansive. I am more interested in the way the qualities of these spaces can be replicated to give similar experiences in more nonconventional settings or environments.

Again, the way a non-commercial space such as a park can be injected into a commercial program interests me. Could it be done? What would it be like? Would it be accepted and used by the community?

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET FOUR. NARRATIVE
The way a building is experienced may start to happen even before the building is entered. The macro scale is important for me to consider when designing. How will a building be entered, what is the journey leading up to the building. Understanding this, then either conforming to or by contrasting this a heightened experience can be created for the user.
It has become apparent to me over the last few years that by trying to achieve a particular spatial quality or feeling across every part of the building is often unsuccessful as it appears to be the norm. For me, the experience is a broader understanding and so, my creating very specific and refined moments, the overall experience is better for it. Instead of trying everywhere, by focusing my efforts into particular moments, the contrast this creates and the wonderment the spaces produce seem to be heightened compared to if the same move or gesture was applied to the whole building.
It is important that these moments I was speaking of above don’t become removed from the architecture itself. If this happens I would consider the outcome unsuccessful. Simply creating a moment within a building does not, for me, constitute meaningful and experiential architecture. I believe, the real magic and joy possible in architecture comes when the experiences had are fluent and integrated. That is, they are not removed from the architecture but instead, are the architecture. This is when architecture is successful at creating positive, memorable and meaningful experiences.
Finally, it’s important that these moments aren’t forced, just as they aren’t removed. The building should suggest potential possibilities but never inscribe or force an experience on a user. How can we create spaces which encourage the user to linger and experience, yet still allow them the freedom and seduction to move to other spaces within the building? I think this is done through subtlety. Where one space isn’t compromised by the suggestion of another space, rather the link is subtle and doesn’t detract from the primary.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET FOUR. NARRATIVE

The way a building is experienced may start to happen even before the building is entered. The macro scale is important for me to consider when designing. How will a building be entered, what is the journey leading up to the building. Understanding this, then either conforming to or by contrasting this a heightened experience can be created for the user.

It has become apparent to me over the last few years that by trying to achieve a particular spatial quality or feeling across every part of the building is often unsuccessful as it appears to be the norm. For me, the experience is a broader understanding and so, my creating very specific and refined moments, the overall experience is better for it. Instead of trying everywhere, by focusing my efforts into particular moments, the contrast this creates and the wonderment the spaces produce seem to be heightened compared to if the same move or gesture was applied to the whole building.

It is important that these moments I was speaking of above don’t become removed from the architecture itself. If this happens I would consider the outcome unsuccessful. Simply creating a moment within a building does not, for me, constitute meaningful and experiential architecture. I believe, the real magic and joy possible in architecture comes when the experiences had are fluent and integrated. That is, they are not removed from the architecture but instead, are the architecture. This is when architecture is successful at creating positive, memorable and meaningful experiences.

Finally, it’s important that these moments aren’t forced, just as they aren’t removed. The building should suggest potential possibilities but never inscribe or force an experience on a user. How can we create spaces which encourage the user to linger and experience, yet still allow them the freedom and seduction to move to other spaces within the building? I think this is done through subtlety. Where one space isn’t compromised by the suggestion of another space, rather the link is subtle and doesn’t detract from the primary.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET THREE. FORM
Form and mass share a close relationship and are easily interchangeable. The physical presence of a building is an important aspect to consider when designing a building. How does the building sit within its urban landscape? What relationship does it then share with the site and the surrounding context. For example a three or four story building, sited in the suburb of Subiaco makes a different statement to one that is eight or nine stories. This is based purely on mass, and at this stage is not even reliant on material or other points of difference. For me, its important that a building sits well within its landscape. That does not mean that it has to conform to the street norm, however, the norm must be understood before it can be challenged or broken. The statement a building makes to the street and surround has an impact on the way it is experienced by the community.
Function is a key driver in the form of a building. A building is there to serve a specific purpose, the way it is composed should be grounded in a strong understanding of the buildings intended immediate and future use. The program of a building is highly influential in the way the building is experienced and for me, should take priority over preoccupations about external form.
Once context and program are resolved, the opportunity comes to exploit environmental factors for the benefit of the building. In a climate like that of Perth, this should be a key priority. That includes taking advantage of the sun and sea breeze. For instance, it would be better to orient a building such that it does not receive large amounts of solar penetration. Can the form be manipulated to give these rich experiential qualities while also satisfying some sort of thoughtful and considerate environmental actions or responses.
Does this form allow for all of the above? Is the desired outcome being achieved?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET THREE. FORM

Form and mass share a close relationship and are easily interchangeable. The physical presence of a building is an important aspect to consider when designing a building. How does the building sit within its urban landscape? What relationship does it then share with the site and the surrounding context.
For example a three or four story building, sited in the suburb of Subiaco makes a different statement to one that is eight or nine stories. This is based purely on mass, and at this stage is not even reliant on material or other points of difference.
For me, its important that a building sits well within its landscape. That does not mean that it has to conform to the street norm, however, the norm must be understood before it can be challenged or broken. The statement a building makes to the street and surround has an impact on the way it is experienced by the community.

Function is a key driver in the form of a building. A building is there to serve a specific purpose, the way it is composed should be grounded in a strong understanding of the buildings intended immediate and future use. The program of a building is highly influential in the way the building is experienced and for me, should take priority over preoccupations about external form.

Once context and program are resolved, the opportunity comes to exploit environmental factors for the benefit of the building. In a climate like that of Perth, this should be a key priority. That includes taking advantage of the sun and sea breeze. For instance, it would be better to orient a building such that it does not receive large amounts of solar penetration. Can the form be manipulated to give these rich experiential qualities while also satisfying some sort of thoughtful and considerate environmental actions or responses.

Does this form allow for all of the above? Is the desired outcome being achieved?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET ELEVEN+TWELVE. CAR+PARK

As the above preoccupations all dealt with a particular quality or material aspect of a building, I felt it important to put it into practice. It was my intent at the start of the cards to create a mock design project almost, as the vehicle for testing these things. As it has been alluded to above, the ways in which space is considered or the ways in which something considered to be open could be inserted into something typically considered to be closed has been of interest to me. All of these ideas started with the overarching idea of experience. I took this to be the way I and the broader community experience Perth. Ultimately this lead me to the discovery and understanding of the reliance placed on personal modes of transport and the priority give to open space. It was my opinion that the area these two occupations take away from the urban fabric, negatively contributed to the experience of Perth. How could these two aspects be combined, streamlined if you will, to be more efficient and to positively contribute to the experiences of Perth. The solution was the idea of the car+park. This was the ‘vehicle’ and a way of considering space, light, material, texture, etc. to not only better understand my own interests but the way that they could be used to contribute better architecture and better experience to the city which I live.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET TEN. TEXTURE
Just as is the case for material, texture plays an important role in the experience of a building. For instance, an old brick wall may evoke feelings of nostalgia in the user. The texture of this might suggest timelessness and history and encourages the user to consider the space for something other, something deeper than just function. The way the texture presents itself to the occupant might encourage them to engage with the space or, conversely, pass by quickly
This has some reliance on the way it holds the light. For instance, to use the same example of brick, a glazed brick, which presents itself almost like a tile holds and reflects the light differently to an exposed, old brick wall.
I think its important to consider all of these cases in context. By selecting a texture, you must consider what role it will have within the building and what the experience of this will be. By combining a number of differently textured, yet uniform materials in a building, moments can be created about these points of difference. If you were to use a single material with a single material finish it becomes mundane and uniform, but by breaking it up with subtle differences in texture and finish the way these spaces and points of difference are experienced become heightened.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET TEN. TEXTURE

Just as is the case for material, texture plays an important role in the experience of a building. For instance, an old brick wall may evoke feelings of nostalgia in the user. The texture of this might suggest timelessness and history and encourages the user to consider the space for something other, something deeper than just function. The way the texture presents itself to the occupant might encourage them to engage with the space or, conversely, pass by quickly

This has some reliance on the way it holds the light. For instance, to use the same example of brick, a glazed brick, which presents itself almost like a tile holds and reflects the light differently to an exposed, old brick wall.

I think its important to consider all of these cases in context. By selecting a texture, you must consider what role it will have within the building and what the experience of this will be. By combining a number of differently textured, yet uniform materials in a building, moments can be created about these points of difference. If you were to use a single material with a single material finish it becomes mundane and uniform, but by breaking it up with subtle differences in texture and finish the way these spaces and points of difference are experienced become heightened.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET NINE. MATERIAL.
Forgetting the vast range of materials for just one moment. Think about the vast ways in which a specific material may be handled. Each of these gives a different outcome. For instance brick can be treated in a number of different manners, all of which produce a different way of experiencing the product. Add to that the various different finishes available when selecting brick and the outcomes become infinite. What quality do you want to achieve? What material is the best to help achieve this? How will it be treated?
Materials react to each other. That is, one material looks different and creates a different sense of space when coupled with different materials. How can a material quality be enriched by another material?
The reactions between materials may happen for a number of different reasons and the reasons why must be considered when designing. For instance, are the materials in contrast because of the perceived properties, something delicate like a piece of fabric coupled with a massive and rough rammed earth wall. It is these reactions, the subtleties that heighten the experience. Is the reaction the one you desired? Is it reacting for the right reasons or is it merely just a coincidence that these work well together. When materials complement each other, due to more than just aesthetics and the reactions happen as a result of the properties, colours, presence etc. that’s when real intrigue, interest and appreciation starts to take place.
Materials react with each other based on all of the above circumstances. They must be considered with regard to proximity also. If materials are too close they may start to overpower each other and create an adverse experience. Just as if they are too far apart, the contrast may not be evident and the outcome will become lost.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET NINE. MATERIAL.

Forgetting the vast range of materials for just one moment. Think about the vast ways in which a specific material may be handled. Each of these gives a different outcome. For instance brick can be treated in a number of different manners, all of which produce a different way of experiencing the product. Add to that the various different finishes available when selecting brick and the outcomes become infinite. What quality do you want to achieve? What material is the best to help achieve this? How will it be treated?

Materials react to each other. That is, one material looks different and creates a different sense of space when coupled with different materials. How can a material quality be enriched by another material?

The reactions between materials may happen for a number of different reasons and the reasons why must be considered when designing. For instance, are the materials in contrast because of the perceived properties, something delicate like a piece of fabric coupled with a massive and rough rammed earth wall. It is these reactions, the subtleties that heighten the experience. Is the reaction the one you desired? Is it reacting for the right reasons or is it merely just a coincidence that these work well together. When materials complement each other, due to more than just aesthetics and the reactions happen as a result of the properties, colours, presence etc. that’s when real intrigue, interest and appreciation starts to take place.

Materials react with each other based on all of the above circumstances. They must be considered with regard to proximity also. If materials are too close they may start to overpower each other and create an adverse experience. Just as if they are too far apart, the contrast may not be evident and the outcome will become lost.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET EIGHT. LIGHT.
The way in which light can be manipulated leads to vastly different, highly experiential architecture. It should be apparent that all of these personal preoccupations can start to be linked to each other both directly and indirectly. Light, plays a big role in the idea of narrative, for me. Particullary in the way a space can be experienced, but then the ways it can suggest something beyond and act as a way to propose movement to something beyond. Light can be used to frame a space, to give it prescence and emphasis.
Just as light can encourage movement and be suggestive it can be manipulated to do the opposite. Light might be used to act as a barrier or to disguise a particular component or object. The way light is controlled and directed can give credibility to the definition of space. For instance the way light is controlled may suggest a division within an open room, this is a division of space which is transient and easily malleable dependent upon the desired experience to be created.
There is no denying that light plays an important role in the experiences I try to create within my work. The way a room is lit has a massive impact on the way it is experienced. Again, this should be considered with the purpose of the space in mind. If a room is dark, it will be experienced and used in a different way if it was highly luminous. Similarly, natural light has a different effect to artificial lighting. All of these things should be considered when designing spaces. Is there a particular feeling or effect that you are trying to recreate? How does the light fall in that experience? Is it even possible to recreate that in this space?
As was suggested before, light can suggest or provoke movement within, through or into another space. In the same way it can draw your attention to a particular aspect or area within a space. Just as light draws you to a space, its secondary properties should also be considered. Are people being drawn to that pool of light for the light or is it because it is in the middle of winter and the light is in fact seen as a source of warmth and comfort?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET EIGHT. LIGHT.

The way in which light can be manipulated leads to vastly different, highly experiential architecture. It should be apparent that all of these personal preoccupations can start to be linked to each other both directly and indirectly. Light, plays a big role in the idea of narrative, for me. Particullary in the way a space can be experienced, but then the ways it can suggest something beyond and act as a way to propose movement to something beyond. Light can be used to frame a space, to give it prescence and emphasis.

Just as light can encourage movement and be suggestive it can be manipulated to do the opposite. Light might be used to act as a barrier or to disguise a particular component or object. The way light is controlled and directed can give credibility to the definition of space. For instance the way light is controlled may suggest a division within an open room, this is a division of space which is transient and easily malleable dependent upon the desired experience to be created.

There is no denying that light plays an important role in the experiences I try to create within my work. The way a room is lit has a massive impact on the way it is experienced. Again, this should be considered with the purpose of the space in mind. If a room is dark, it will be experienced and used in a different way if it was highly luminous. Similarly, natural light has a different effect to artificial lighting. All of these things should be considered when designing spaces. Is there a particular feeling or effect that you are trying to recreate? How does the light fall in that experience? Is it even possible to recreate that in this space?

As was suggested before, light can suggest or provoke movement within, through or into another space. In the same way it can draw your attention to a particular aspect or area within a space. Just as light draws you to a space, its secondary properties should also be considered. Are people being drawn to that pool of light for the light or is it because it is in the middle of winter and the light is in fact seen as a source of warmth and comfort?

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET SEVEN. SPACE.
Space and what constitutes it is of great interest to me. I think it’s fascinating how personal perception essentially defines space. What one may consider to be space, may be considered by another not to be. For me, I don’t think there is such a thing as non-space. I think that there can be negative or less defined space, but all in all, everything should be considered.
That means that space may be defined by physical boundaries. Walls, flooring, roofing etc all in my mind constitute a tangible boundary or edge. Ultimately this boundary or edge is what constitutes or defines one space from another. Again though, this starts to link in with the previous set of cards and the idea of threshold. At what point does something cease to exist as it was originally defined? How far can something be broken down and removed until meaning is changed?
This leads on from the last point, how is space defined when not physically bounded? For me, as the diagrams suggest, this may be negative space or space which is constituted by moveable or less rigid means. This might include something like furniture or people.
Can a space be considered fixed or defined, but then be further separated or broken down into smaller, less physically bounded, but still highly defined spaces. The idea that a park, an unbounded space, be inserted into a physically defined space such as a building.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET SEVEN. SPACE.

Space and what constitutes it is of great interest to me. I think it’s fascinating how personal perception essentially defines space. What one may consider to be space, may be considered by another not to be. For me, I don’t think there is such a thing as non-space. I think that there can be negative or less defined space, but all in all, everything should be considered.

That means that space may be defined by physical boundaries. Walls, flooring, roofing etc all in my mind constitute a tangible boundary or edge. Ultimately this boundary or edge is what constitutes or defines one space from another. Again though, this starts to link in with the previous set of cards and the idea of threshold. At what point does something cease to exist as it was originally defined? How far can something be broken down and removed until meaning is changed?

This leads on from the last point, how is space defined when not physically bounded? For me, as the diagrams suggest, this may be negative space or space which is constituted by moveable or less rigid means. This might include something like furniture or people.

Can a space be considered fixed or defined, but then be further separated or broken down into smaller, less physically bounded, but still highly defined spaces. The idea that a park, an unbounded space, be inserted into a physically defined space such as a building.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET FIVE. SCALE
I think it’s important that commercial realities are realised and that practicing architecture does not mean design units or competition architecture. Therefore it is important that architecture first and foremost, is for the client. The proposal is what they asked for or require, second to that the architecture becomes yours. This is an idea which is realistically probably easier said than done, however, I think it is important to work to the constraints of commercial realities while still recognising and being able to make the architecture ‘yours’. This seems to be an idea which is prominent in a lot of the lectures we have had so far.
Conversely there is the park scale. These are large areas of open expansive space with little to no commercial value. To me, it is interesting to see how, and indeed if, these two polar opposites could combine to create a rich experience. To take a park, typically public, and turn it commercial seems to have lost the intent for me. How could a park be considered within a commercial operation and the ways in which the qualities of open space could be applied to a commercial product seems to be a more important and challenging question.
Human scale is important in all aspects of architecture. The way a building relates to and caters for human proportions is incredibly important in the outcome and experience offered. For a space to be expansive does not mean that it has to be physically open and expansive. I am more interested in the way the qualities of these spaces can be replicated to give similar experiences in more nonconventional settings or environments.
Again, the way a non-commercial space such as a park can be injected into a commercial program interests me. Could it be done? What would it be like? Would it be accepted and used by the community?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET FIVE. SCALE

I think it’s important that commercial realities are realised and that practicing architecture does not mean design units or competition architecture. Therefore it is important that architecture first and foremost, is for the client. The proposal is what they asked for or require, second to that the architecture becomes yours. This is an idea which is realistically probably easier said than done, however, I think it is important to work to the constraints of commercial realities while still recognising and being able to make the architecture ‘yours’. This seems to be an idea which is prominent in a lot of the lectures we have had so far.

Conversely there is the park scale. These are large areas of open expansive space with little to no commercial value. To me, it is interesting to see how, and indeed if, these two polar opposites could combine to create a rich experience. To take a park, typically public, and turn it commercial seems to have lost the intent for me. How could a park be considered within a commercial operation and the ways in which the qualities of open space could be applied to a commercial product seems to be a more important and challenging question.

Human scale is important in all aspects of architecture. The way a building relates to and caters for human proportions is incredibly important in the outcome and experience offered. For a space to be expansive does not mean that it has to be physically open and expansive. I am more interested in the way the qualities of these spaces can be replicated to give similar experiences in more nonconventional settings or environments.

Again, the way a non-commercial space such as a park can be injected into a commercial program interests me. Could it be done? What would it be like? Would it be accepted and used by the community?

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET FOUR. NARRATIVE
The way a building is experienced may start to happen even before the building is entered. The macro scale is important for me to consider when designing. How will a building be entered, what is the journey leading up to the building. Understanding this, then either conforming to or by contrasting this a heightened experience can be created for the user.
It has become apparent to me over the last few years that by trying to achieve a particular spatial quality or feeling across every part of the building is often unsuccessful as it appears to be the norm. For me, the experience is a broader understanding and so, my creating very specific and refined moments, the overall experience is better for it. Instead of trying everywhere, by focusing my efforts into particular moments, the contrast this creates and the wonderment the spaces produce seem to be heightened compared to if the same move or gesture was applied to the whole building.
It is important that these moments I was speaking of above don’t become removed from the architecture itself. If this happens I would consider the outcome unsuccessful. Simply creating a moment within a building does not, for me, constitute meaningful and experiential architecture. I believe, the real magic and joy possible in architecture comes when the experiences had are fluent and integrated. That is, they are not removed from the architecture but instead, are the architecture. This is when architecture is successful at creating positive, memorable and meaningful experiences.
Finally, it’s important that these moments aren’t forced, just as they aren’t removed. The building should suggest potential possibilities but never inscribe or force an experience on a user. How can we create spaces which encourage the user to linger and experience, yet still allow them the freedom and seduction to move to other spaces within the building? I think this is done through subtlety. Where one space isn’t compromised by the suggestion of another space, rather the link is subtle and doesn’t detract from the primary.

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET FOUR. NARRATIVE

The way a building is experienced may start to happen even before the building is entered. The macro scale is important for me to consider when designing. How will a building be entered, what is the journey leading up to the building. Understanding this, then either conforming to or by contrasting this a heightened experience can be created for the user.

It has become apparent to me over the last few years that by trying to achieve a particular spatial quality or feeling across every part of the building is often unsuccessful as it appears to be the norm. For me, the experience is a broader understanding and so, my creating very specific and refined moments, the overall experience is better for it. Instead of trying everywhere, by focusing my efforts into particular moments, the contrast this creates and the wonderment the spaces produce seem to be heightened compared to if the same move or gesture was applied to the whole building.

It is important that these moments I was speaking of above don’t become removed from the architecture itself. If this happens I would consider the outcome unsuccessful. Simply creating a moment within a building does not, for me, constitute meaningful and experiential architecture. I believe, the real magic and joy possible in architecture comes when the experiences had are fluent and integrated. That is, they are not removed from the architecture but instead, are the architecture. This is when architecture is successful at creating positive, memorable and meaningful experiences.

Finally, it’s important that these moments aren’t forced, just as they aren’t removed. The building should suggest potential possibilities but never inscribe or force an experience on a user. How can we create spaces which encourage the user to linger and experience, yet still allow them the freedom and seduction to move to other spaces within the building? I think this is done through subtlety. Where one space isn’t compromised by the suggestion of another space, rather the link is subtle and doesn’t detract from the primary.

hesjonathananderson:


CARD SET THREE. FORM
Form and mass share a close relationship and are easily interchangeable. The physical presence of a building is an important aspect to consider when designing a building. How does the building sit within its urban landscape? What relationship does it then share with the site and the surrounding context. For example a three or four story building, sited in the suburb of Subiaco makes a different statement to one that is eight or nine stories. This is based purely on mass, and at this stage is not even reliant on material or other points of difference. For me, its important that a building sits well within its landscape. That does not mean that it has to conform to the street norm, however, the norm must be understood before it can be challenged or broken. The statement a building makes to the street and surround has an impact on the way it is experienced by the community.
Function is a key driver in the form of a building. A building is there to serve a specific purpose, the way it is composed should be grounded in a strong understanding of the buildings intended immediate and future use. The program of a building is highly influential in the way the building is experienced and for me, should take priority over preoccupations about external form.
Once context and program are resolved, the opportunity comes to exploit environmental factors for the benefit of the building. In a climate like that of Perth, this should be a key priority. That includes taking advantage of the sun and sea breeze. For instance, it would be better to orient a building such that it does not receive large amounts of solar penetration. Can the form be manipulated to give these rich experiential qualities while also satisfying some sort of thoughtful and considerate environmental actions or responses.
Does this form allow for all of the above? Is the desired outcome being achieved?

hesjonathananderson:

CARD SET THREE. FORM

Form and mass share a close relationship and are easily interchangeable. The physical presence of a building is an important aspect to consider when designing a building. How does the building sit within its urban landscape? What relationship does it then share with the site and the surrounding context.
For example a three or four story building, sited in the suburb of Subiaco makes a different statement to one that is eight or nine stories. This is based purely on mass, and at this stage is not even reliant on material or other points of difference.
For me, its important that a building sits well within its landscape. That does not mean that it has to conform to the street norm, however, the norm must be understood before it can be challenged or broken. The statement a building makes to the street and surround has an impact on the way it is experienced by the community.

Function is a key driver in the form of a building. A building is there to serve a specific purpose, the way it is composed should be grounded in a strong understanding of the buildings intended immediate and future use. The program of a building is highly influential in the way the building is experienced and for me, should take priority over preoccupations about external form.

Once context and program are resolved, the opportunity comes to exploit environmental factors for the benefit of the building. In a climate like that of Perth, this should be a key priority. That includes taking advantage of the sun and sea breeze. For instance, it would be better to orient a building such that it does not receive large amounts of solar penetration. Can the form be manipulated to give these rich experiential qualities while also satisfying some sort of thoughtful and considerate environmental actions or responses.

Does this form allow for all of the above? Is the desired outcome being achieved?

About:

A group of architecture students expressing and exploring our EXPERIENCE through a layering and progressional tree structure. Focusing on common and or unique trigger points to begin our collective and personal repose of EXPERIENTIAL QUALITIES AND ATTITUDES in architecture.

Trigger Points.

WeekOne.Perth
WeekTwo.Space